2018-11-11 (Guldsöndag)

Today, I learned that:

My prediction on 2018-04-15 was correct, 2018 would be the year of AIK. After the last round of Allsvenskan, the Swedish football championship league, once more AIK ended up being the very best! Oh how happy I am!

And as a tribute to the Stockholm region, where AIK has its headquarters, today’s photo shows a marvellous view of Stockholm. The photo was taken on 2018-11-04 from Skinnarviksberget, Södermalm and it shows the City Hall and Riddarholmen.

A photo of Stockholm, showing the City Hall and Riddarholmen, taken from Skinnarviksberget, Södermalm on 2018-11-04.

Furthermore, it is another photo in my series of hosts of the Olympic Games. Most people know that Stockholm was the host of the Summer Olympic Games in 1912, but did you know that it also hosted the Games in 1956? Since Australia had harsh quarantine restrictions, the equestrian events of the Melbourne games were moved to Stockholm. More about the Stockholm games can be found in references #1 and 2 below. Finally, today marks the exact centenary of the armistice after World War I. Exactly one year ago, I wrote about it extensively, you can find it here.

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: 1912 Summer Olympics

2: Equestrian events at 1956 Summer Olympics

*: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-05-24 (Thursday)

Today, I learned that:

Last Sunday, the Swedish male icehockey team won the World Championships again. You may remember from my post of 2017-05-21 how they won it last year as well. And also this year, the title was won after the final penalty shoot out. But this year, their campaign in the whole tournament was almost impeccable, all games won and only one point lost. The final was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, almost a home game then.

So what could be better than to publish a photo of how the team was received on 2018-05-21 at the park Kungsträdgården in central Stockholm. My Brazilian friend who lives there was also enjoying himself in the sunshine and sent me some nice photos and video clips, muito obrigado! This photo shows the moment when John Klingberg raises the trophy to the enthusiastic crowd’s cheers.

Kungsan

In April, I invested quite some time to accompany all the details of the world championship in curling for male teams, which happened in Las Vegas, NV, USA, as I already anticipated in my post of 2018-03-24. Have a look at the photos below. Besides the different feeding habits of the Swedish and Japanese teams during the mid-game intermission, it is also interesting to note that although the competition is hosted by one of the densest neon and electronic cities in the world, the scoreboards are still manual, mechanical ones with the scores being recorded by magnetic tabs. (In the women’s tournament in March, all scoreboards were electronic.)

LV2018

Three photos taken during the round robin game between Sweden and Japan on 2018-04-06. It is interesting to note how the Japanese cannot forget their habit of bringing the traditional obento, i.e. a lunch box full with culinary delicacies. All photos are screenshoots from the video coverage supplied by the World Curling Federation. See also reference #1 below.

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: Japan v Sweden – Round-robin – 361º World Men’s Curling Championship 2018

*: What did you learn in school today ?

2016-05-22 (Sunday)

Today, I learned that:

The Brazilian-Swedish seminar I attended earlier this week, see my post of 2016-05-18 , was in fact the fifth of the same type that SACF (Swedish Academic Collaboration Forum) arranged. Earlier, it had been hosted in Korea, Singapore, China, and Indonesia, all with the aim to promote the exchange of ideas and opinions in academic matters and scientific research. In February, 2017, there is planned another event, where the participating countries of these five seminars will gather in Stockholm, Sweden, for a follow-up.

Today, I will concentrate on the seminar in Brazil and hope to be able to comment on the earlier four on a later occasion. The two days in Brasília were packed with interesting presentations and networking opportunities. And the earlier weeks of commotion in the federal capital could not be seen here, on the contrary. There were many positive and inspiring comments on what happens when Brazilians and Swedes join forces in advancing the frontiers of science.

Basically, there were four kinds of seminars in one:

  • Top level management sessions, where the most prominent representatives from the Brazilian and Swedish universities discussed “Internationalisation and Collaboration in Higher Education”, “Funding for promoting world class research collaboration”, and “Brazil-Sweden: Importance of University & Industry collaboration”.
  • 5 different series of academic sessions, namely “Imaging and Visualization in Life Science”, “Novel Functional Materials and Nanotechnology” (2 parallel sessions due to the number of topics presented),”Inclusive Education: Gender & Ethnicity”, “Sustainable Development: Energy, Environment and Biodiversity”, and “Machine Intelligence and Autonomy” (also 2 parallel sessions due to the number of topics presented).
  • A funding seminar, where funding agencies and universities interchanged ideas and suggestions about various aspects of funding of scientific research.
  • An innovation seminar, where the Swedish innovation agency Vinnova presented programs for funding and gave various examples of successful Swedish-Brazilian projects.

I decided to dedicate my time of the academic sessions to learn more about new materials and nanotechnology, to follow up the knowledge I had acquired through the MOOC about graphene in 2015, see also my post of 2016-02-01. Below are some pictures I took of the event.

I wish to extend my sincere gratitude for inviting me, to the organizers of this extra ordinary seminar with so many brilliant minds gathered in one place, Gustaf Cars (Uppsala University), Helena Balogh (Linköping University), and Åsa Valadi (Chalmers University of Technology)!

CAPES

Update 2016-05-29:

On the web site of CAPES, there is further information, with photos, of the two days of seminar. Please consult references #2 and 3 below.

Finally, I just learned that the mysterious first chord of the Beatles song from 1964,”A hard day’s night”, in fact are three different chords, played by George Harrison, John Lennon and Paul McCartney, joined into one. That is what I call a perfect cooperation project! Reference #1 below, in Portuguese, presents all the facts behind this Magical Mystery Chord, with images and video clips.

… That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: Um acorde mágico dos Beatles revelado depois de 52 anos de mistério

2: Capes recebe Seminário de Excelência Brasil-Suécia

3: Brasil e Suécia pretendem intensificar cooperação científica entre os dois países

+: What did you learn in school today ?

2016-04-23 (Saturday)

Today, I learned that:

The photo below is one I took on 2009-01-16 of the Stone Mountain, in the Metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The original photo, a huge gigapan photo with a file size of 110 MB, can be found in reference #1 below. The built-in photo browser will permit that you zoom in on interesting parts of the photo, e.g. the carvings in the stone in the center of this photo. Reference #2 below contains interesting information about Stone Mountain.

SM+

Photo I took on 2009-01-16 of the Stone Mountain, in the Metropolitan area of Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The original photo, a gigapan photo of 110 MB, can be found on http://www.gigapan.com/gigapans/15165 . The built-in photo browser will permit that you zoom in on interesting parts of the photo, e.g. the carvings in the stone in the center of this photo.

This is my way of paying a tribute to the saint which is celebrated today and whose name I am also proud of bearing. I am of course talking about Saint George. According to the legend, he was a Roman soldier who died on 304-04-23. His big contribution to history was as a martyr who battled successfully with a dragon. References #3 and 4 below give more information.

SGod

The famous sculpture of Saint George battling with the dragon, from Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden

That Saint George is still remembered today, can be seen in the many countries, states, cities, etc. that incorporate his name, such as the republic of Georgia, ex-USSR; the US state of Georgia, etc. The red cross in the English and British flags is called Saint George’s cross. Furthermore, it is still a popular name which many parents give to their new-born baby boy, as can be seen below:

English: George; Deutsch: Georg, Jürgen; Français: Georges; Italiano: Giorgio, Español / Português: Jorge; Svenska: Georg, Göran, Jörgen; Suomalainen: Yrjö; Pусский (Russian): Юрий (Yuri); Polski: Jerzy; etc., and of course their female correspondences.

… That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: View from Stone Mountain Inn

2: Stone Mountain

3: Saint George’s Day

4: Saint George

+: What did you learn in school today ?

2016-01-24 (Sunday)

Today, I learned that:

The largest prime number ever found was announced last Wednesday, January 20, 2016. So, what is a prime number and what is it good for?

A prime number is defined as a natural number (a positive integer) greather than 1, which cannot be evenly divided by any other natural number than 1 and itself. Examples of such numbers are 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, etc. It has been proven that there are an infinite quantity of prime numbers.

Prime numbers have been known for a long time, e.g. Euclid’s Elements (300 years BC) already mentions them, and in the beginning of the 17th century, a French monk named Marin Mersenne devised a formula, of the form 2p – 1, where p=1 is a prime number, to be used to check for unknown prime numbers. In fact, the largest prime number, which is exactly 274.207.281 − 1, consists of more than 22 million digits, and the search for bigger numbers continue. Please see the three references below for more information about prime numbers in general and also about the discovery of the currently biggest prime number, including an interview with Curtis Cooper, the leader of the project that discovered it.

One of the practical usages of prime numbers is in public-key cryptography, where two large prime numbers are multiplied to obtain a product that it is extremely difficult to factorize and thus break the code. But the search for these very big numbers does not seem to have any major practical use today, although they are very well fitted to test the speed performance of computer hardware.

And speaking about cryptography, having means of obtaining secure data streams is of course essential when we want to communicate data from one point to another. The current standard for data communication in the world is based upon what is called fourth-generation (4G) technology, and although it offers very fast rates of data communication, there are applications that demand even faster data transmission speeds. Examples of such applications are some components of the ‘Internet of Things’ (e.g. driver-less cars), and also in remote surgery, when the patient is in a hospital somewhere in the world, and at the same time the head surgeon is in a totally different place, performing the surgery via advanced, fast video and manipulation technologies.

For that and other purposes, last Friday, January 22, 2016, TeliaSonera and Ericsson announced that in 2018, they will start 5G networks in Stockholm and Tallinn. The rest of Sweden should see 5G in use in 2020.

Update on 2016-01-27: Today’s program of ‘Vetenskapens värld’ on Radio Sweden’s domestic channel P1 penetrates into the 5G technology. It will be a standard mostly used for machine to machine communication, and there are good hopes that one standard will be used everywhere on Earth, with speeds 100 times higher than the current 4G standard. See reference 7 below.

… That’s what I learned in school!

Refs.:

1: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prime_number

2: http://www.mersenne.org/primes/?press=M74207281

3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q5ozBnrd5Zc

4: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-key_cryptography

5: http://news.err.ee/v/scitech/fd66b9ee-1a44-4d13-aa6c-1f687812b2b8/

6: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mobile_phone_generations

7: http://sverigesradio.se/sida/avsnitt/668029?programid=412

+: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VucczIg98Gw