2018-11-11 (Guldsöndag)

Today, I learned that: My prediction on 2018-04-15 was correct, 2018 would be the year of AIK. After the last round of Allsvenskan, the Swedish football championship league, once more AIK ended up being the very best! Oh how happy I am! And as tribute to the Stockholm region, where AIK has its headquarters, today’s header photo shows a marvellous view of Stockholm. The photo was taken on 2018-11-04 from Skinnarviksberget, Södermalm and it shows the City Hall and Riddarholmen. Furthermore, it is another photo in my series of hosts of the Olympic Games. Most people know that Stockholm was the host of the Summer Olympic Games in 1912, but did you know that it also hosted the Games in 1956? Since Australia had harsh quarantine restrictions, the equestrian events were moved to Stockholm. More about those games can be found in references #1 and 2 below. Finally, today marks the exact centenary of the armistice after World War I. Exactly one year ago, I wrote about it extensively, you can find it here. That’s what I learned in school ! Refs.: 1: 1912 Summer Olympics 2: Equestrian events at 1956 Summer Olympics *: What did you learn in school today ?
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2018-10-20 (Saturday)

Today, I learned that:

Continuing the post from 2018-09-29, here are two more interesting British facts from the world of Sports:

Wimbledon surrenders to John Isner

The American tennis player John Isner is, among other things, well known for having participated in the two longest fifth sets in the history of the Wimbledon tournament. In 2010, he beat the Frenchman Nicholas Mahut after winning the fifth set by 70-68, after three calendar days and 8 h 11 min of playing time. Then in this year’s tournament, in the semifinals, he lost to the South African player Kevin Anderson by 26-24 in the fifth set.

But that is the end of such marathon games, because as of 2019, Wimbledon has decided to introduce a tie-breaker at 12-12 in the fifth set.

See also references # 1 and 2 below.

Scotswoman breaks record for touring the world on a bicycle

In Britain, there are not only wonder women in golf. The Scottish cyclist Jenny Graham just arrived in Berlin after having gone on a tour around the world. You may remember that in the Jules Verne novel Around the World in Eighty days, her compatriot Phileas Fogg made it, using trains and steamer ships on 80 days. Jenny did not totally get there, but nevertheless her record is an amazing 124  days! (Another Brit, Mark Beaumont, holds the male record, set in September 2017, with 78 days 14 h 14 min., thus beating Phileas Fogg.)

Jenny Graham

Jenny Graham stops for a selfie while passing the Russian city of Pskov, close to the borders with Estonia and Latvia. Courtesy of Jenny Graham/The Adventure Syndicate/PA.

See also references # 3, 4, and 5 below.

Donkey steps

On various occasions, I have referenced material from Sveriges Radio (the Swedish Broadcasting Corporation), and here is yet another one:

Yesterday, their correspondent at the EU headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, Andreas Liljeheden, published a chronicle about the particular construction of the stair case between the two main buildings of the European Parliament. The following photo shows exactly that view.

EU steps

The court yard in the EU Parliament in Brussels, Belgium, highlighting the donkey steps between the two main buildings. Photo taken by Andreas Liljeheden on 2018-10-18.

As you can see, the vertical displacement from one step to another is small, but the horizontal one is much greater, exactly 1,16 m according to Andreas’ measurement. This makes walking up and down the stairs a complicated task. He investigated the origins of that crazy stair case, and found that in some countries of the European continent, such as Austria and Germany, there is a tradition of using deeper steps, whereas the Belgians and Dutch normally, due to the higher population density, have to settle with a different project, with a higher vertical-to-horizontal ratio. Sweden is, as always, “lagom”, i.e. mid-way.

Here are two more photos of donkey steps, the first one being a close-up of the EU Parliament steps, and the second one a typical scene of donkeys climbing the steps in Fira, the capital of the island of Santorini in the Greek Aegean Sea.

Belgium&Greece

Two examples of donkey steps: To the left, a visitor to the EU Parliament in Brussels, Belgium (photo by Andreas Liljeheden, 2018-10-18). To the right, real donkeys in Fira, Santorini, Greece (photo by Liz Stark, 2016-04-06).

But why is Andreas emphasising this stair case? In no way, he implies that hard working politicians are donkeys, but he thinks it is a symbol for the difficulties encountered by the EU members. If you cannot have a unanimous decision on something by all its 28 member countries (soon to be 27?), then there has to be a compromise, such is life! Thanks Andreas for your valuable contribution!

See also reference #6 below.

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: Longest tennis match records

2: Call It the John Isner Rule: Wimbledon Plans to Add a Final-Set Tiebreaker

3: Scottish cyclist smashes round-the world record

4: Around the World in Eighty Days

5: Around the world in 78 days: British cyclist completes record-breaking ride

6: Åsnetrappor typiskt för EU: Ekots Andreas Liljeheden, Bryssel

*: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-09-29 (When I’m 64)

Today, I learned that:

Once more, I woke up this morning with a tune in my head. And this time it was presented by the Beatles, and they dedicated it to me! Watch and listen to reference # 1 below.

Another extremely skilful Englishwoman is the amateur golf player Ali Gibbs. On 2018-08-17, she defended her club champion title at Croham Hurst Golf Club, South of London, with brilliance. In one of the 18-hole rounds, she hit two hole-in-ones, and in the other round yet another hole-in-one. (She had already scored three hole-in-one shots before in her career, on three earlier, distinct occasions).

Ali Gibbs

Ali Gibbs showing the three lucky balls. Photo by Simon Jacobs/Magnus News

The probability of an average golfer scoring a hole-in-one once in their life is calculated to be 1 : 12 500, for a professional to 1 : 2 500, but to hit three in only 36 holes is more than 1 : 1,9 trillion! Read more in reference # 2 below.

London, UK, River Thames

And while we are still in the London area, why not visit the capital. The photo above shows a beautiful bird’s eye view of River Thames and the Tower Bridge. London has already hosted the Olympic Summer Games on three occasions, in 1908, 1948, and 2012. More about those events can be found in references #3, #4, and #5 below.

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: When I’m 64

2: 1.9 Trillion to one – Golfer Ali defies the odds to sink three holes-in-one in a day

3: 1908 Summer Olympics

4: 1948 Summer Olympics

5: 2012 Summer Olympics

*: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-09-23 (Spring is in the Air)

Today, I learned that:

Today is the day of the Equinox, which to the inhabitants of the Southern hemisphere means the official start of spring. So my post today is dedicated almost to that and correlated facts.

First, today’s photo shows three maritaca birds sitting on a wire. This species, with the Latin name of Pionus, is rather commonly seen in the wild. They are considered friendly, but have a bad reputation of eating the wires. I took the photo on 2018-09-20 in the city of Osvaldo Cruz, SP, Brazil. See also reference #1 below.

Maritacas

Three maritaca birds sitting on a wire. Photo taken in Osvaldo Cruz, SP, Brazil on 2018-09-20.

But spring is not fun all the time, seeing these birds reminds me of a ground breaking book published in September 1962 by the American biologist Rachel Carson about how human kind is destroying the Earth by using pesticides indiscriminately. At the time, it had a big impact, and among other things led to the creation of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). See also reference #2 below.

And similarly to the situation then, we are now facing the indiscriminate use of plastics. In the following are some recent facts about how it pollutes our oceans, but mind you there are many more examples out there:

Whale dies in Thailand after swallowing 80 plastic bags

On 2018-06-03 was reported that a small pilot whale which died after having consumed 80 plastic bags, weighing a total of 8 kg, thus making it impossible for the whale to eat any nutritional food. A veterinary team tried to keep the whale alive, but in vain. See also reference #3 below.

Plastic pollution in the Mediterranean Sea threatens the health of the ocean

On 2018-06-08, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) published a report on the high content of plastics in the Mediterranean Sea:

  • Record levels of pollution from microplastics in the Mediterranean Sea are now higher than those in the oceanic ‘garbage patches’ and are threatening marine species, fisheries activities and human health in the region.
  • Plastic represents 95% of the waste in Mediterranean waters and on its beaches today, with over 130 different marine species known to have ingested plastic.
  • Further to the severe consequences of marine litter for wildlife,  there are significant economic consequences. The EU fishing fleet currently suffers an estimated annual economic loss of € 61.7 million due to reduced catch and damage to vessels.
  • See also references #4 and #5 below.

Research project to discover the distribution of micro plastics in the oceans

On 2018-04-18 was announced that the Swedish international tanker shipping company Concordia Maritime is financing a study with three academic bodies in Sweden, the Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment, The University of Gothenburg and the Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), to collect and process information about micro plastics present in the oceans.

By installing a collection device on a tanker, water samples can be collected while it is under way for subsequent analysis by researchers. The aim is to draw conclusions as to the extent, distribution of microplastics and potential consequences for living organisms. See also reference #6 below.

A 600 m long floating boom to collect plastic in the Pacific Ocean

On 2018-09-08 we could read about the deploying of 600 m long floating boom between the US mainland and Hawaii in an attempt to clean up the world’s largest garbage patch.

The buoyant is intended to act like a coastline, trapping some of the 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic estimated to exist there. It is fitted with solar power lights, cameras, sensors and satellite antennas, the cleanup system will communicate its position at all times, allowing a support vessel to fish out the collected plastic every few months and transport it to dry land where it will be recycled. See also reference #7 below.

In loving memory

Finally, exactly 15 years ago to the day, on 2003-09-23, I was reached by the sad news that my uncle, Sten Olof, had deceased. He guided me as to what and where to study when I was a teenager, e.g. advising me to go ahead to study technology, but not forget about languages. That advice is something that I still follow!

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: Pionus

2: Silent Spring

3: Whale dies in Thailand after swallowing 80 plastic bags

4: Plastic pollution in Mediterranean Sea threatens the health of our ocean

5: Out of the plastic trap, saving the Mediterranean from plastic pollution

6: Concordia Maritime collaborates with the Swedish Institute for the Marine Environment to measure microplastics in the oceans

7: Massive boom helps to wrangle Pacific Ocean’s plastic trash

*: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-08-12 (Sunday)

Today, I learned that:

Although the FIFA World Cup 2018 was really a joyful event, one of the best ever, it is once more evident that the slow pace of changes in the rules of the game are detrimental to the temper of many people. So, as I promised in my post of 2018-07-10, here are my 2 cents to make football an even better game:

A very welcome addition to this year’s edition of the World Cup was the introduction of the video assistant referees (VAR) , which made quite a few games more fair than before. Even though it could have been used more often to decide about the outcome of a certain play, it surely made some important contributions to the justice of the games. Here is one such event:

KOR-GER

While the TV image shows a replay of a questionable first Korean goal scored in the final game of group F between South Korea and Germany, the American referee Mark Greiger has been summoned by the FIFA VAR group to revise the play which would result in a Korean lead against Germany in the 93rd minute of the game. He had previously cancelled the goal due to an alleged offside, but the review made him change his decision and confirm the goal. As a consequence, the reigning champion Germany was sent home after the group matches. See also the official match report in reference #1 below .

So, if the referee of the match is the almighty responsible to judge the outcome, even though he might be shown otherwise and still not change his mind, since we now have VAR, why not institute a system just like in the noble sport of tennis?

Most people are probably unaware that in tennis,  the chair umpire, the person sitting in their high chair proclaiming the score etc., is not the ultimately responsible for the outcome of the game. The highest authority, the referee, is rarely seen by the public, but if the players cannot accept the chair umpire’s decision, then they can appeal to the referee, who then makes the final decision. The article in reference #2 describes very well the ruling system in tennis, if you are interested read it through thoroughly.

As you can see from the match report of reference #1, in total there were 11 officials present in the game. My suggestion is, that in cases where there is a fully functional VAR system installed and working during the game, to change the ultimate decision from the referee to the person named as VAR in the match report, i.e. the responsible VAR person of the four mentioned there, and give them the ultimate authority, just as is the case in tennis. If no VAR is present, then of course the referee will still be the ultimate authority of the game.

Another thing that bothers me and many others is the way the extra time (often also referred to as stoppage time) is awarded. At the end of each half of the football game, it is decided how many minutes should be awarded to compensate for interruptions during the game, a very arbitrary procedure. Look at reference #3 which analysed all the games during the group stage of FIFA World Cup 2018. As you can see there, of all the 32 matches analysed, only one game was compensated sufficiently, even overcompensated. It was the game between Germany and Sweden which was 12 s longer than expected. (Maybe as a result of that, Germany also scored the winning goal in the final seconds of the game!)

The worst example of lack of playing time was in the game between Belgium and Tunisia, which should have been compensated by 21 minutes, but only gained 7 minutes extra. The solution is very simple:

Do like in ice hockey, basketball, etc. Stop the watch when no playful activity is going on. Institute 2 halves of 30 minutes each of effective playing time instead of the current 45 minutes halves and the game will be much more dynamic and fair!

There are more things to suggest, such as a more flexible system of substituting players and other matters, but that I will leave that to a future post.

Sydney, Australia, Harbour Bridge during sunset

Harbour Bridge at sunset in Sydney, Australia

This photo is the first in a series of beautiful, highly defined photos from around the world. In the first round of photos, I will present some of the cities which have hosted the Olympic Games over the years. The first photo shows Sydney, the biggest city in Australia, host of the year 2000 Summer Olympic Games. The photo shows a view of one of its landmarks, the Sydney Harbour Bridge. More about Sydney, the Harbour Bridge and the 2000 Olympic Games can be found in references #4, #5, and #6 below.

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: Match report Korea-Germany

2: Officials in tennis

3: We timed every game, World Cup stoppage time is wildly inaccurate.

4: Sydney

5: Sydney Harbour Bridge

6: 2000 Summer Olympic Games

*: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-07-10 (Tuesday)

Today, I learned that:

While I was attending the fantastic course about masterpieces of world literature at edX earlier today, you know the big and very elaborate e-learning site for millions of students, one of its videos showed how Alexander the Great spread Greek culture to the countries he had conquered, about 300 years BC. In this particular video, what most attracted my attention was when one of the lecturers, Martin Puchner, on site in Ephesus, on the current Turkey’s western coast, showed the large amphitheater with seating for 25 000 people that the conqueror had erected there. References 1, 2, and 3 give more details about the course, the video in question and also about Ephesus.

Coincidentally, I and my family visited Ephesus exactly 10 years ago today, on 2008-07-10. Besides the photo below of the amphitheater, there are some more pictures I took from this historical site. When we visited it, only 25 % had been excavated so far, hopefully it is more now, because it is really interesting stuff to see and hear about.

efesus1

This ancient amphitheater in Ephesus was erected by Alexander the Great, in his program to spread Greek culture to the world. It holds 25 000 spectators. Photo taken on 2008-07-10.

efesus2-5

Pictures from the ancient city of Ephesus. Besides the amphitheater, the glorious library in the lower right is well known. All photos taken on 2008-07-10.

Later today, our modern day version of popular theater, sports, will see billions of people attending the first of the two semifinals in FIFA World Cup 2018. After the tournament is over, in my next post I will give you my opinion about what needs to be done to improve football further, to make it even more dynamic and joyful.

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: Masterpieces of World Literature

2: Alexander and the Dissemination of Greek Culture

3: Ephesus

*: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-06-23 (Midsommardagen)

Today, I learned that:

In the midst of the World Championships in football, which takes place in Russia, today is scheduled the game between Sweden and Germany. If we include the games played between the two countries when the biggest German nation was West Germany, this will be the 37th time the countries meet on the football ground, and the 7th time in official games, such as Olympic Games, World Championships or European Championships.

The last time Sweden beat Germany in an official game was in the World Cup 1958, held in Sweden. Tomorrow, we celebrate that exactly 60 years have gone since that game. For Swedes, it is a game to remember forever, not only because Sweden won the match and advanced to the final game, but also because of the marvellous goal made by the Swedish right wing player, Kurt Hamrin, in the last minute of the game. See reference # 1 for more about that World Cup and reference # 2 for a video clip of Hamrin’s feat.

Kurre

Two photos from Kurt Hamrin’s legendary slalom run against Germany in 1958, see the whole video sequence in reference # 2 below.

At the time of writing this post, the current leader in the chase for the Golden Boot, which is awarded to the player who scores most goals in the World Cup, is the Portuguese superstar Cristiano Ronaldo. Implicitly, he is also the main character in today’s photo. It was taken on 2017-06-07 in the Latvian capital of Riga and shows football fans waiting outside Hotel Radisson Blu Latvija to catch a glimpse (and an autograph?) of the Portuguese squad, and of Ronaldo in particular. Thus the number of fans using shirt # 7! (Two days later, in a qualifying match for the 2018 World Cup, Portugal beat Latvia with 3-0, with two goals scored by Cristiano Ronaldo. More about that game can be found in reference #3 below.)

CR7

Football fans outside Hotel Radisson Blu Latvija in Riga waiting to get a glimpse of the Portuguese squad, in particular jersey # 7, the superstar Cristiano Ronaldo, thus the multitude of fans wearing that shirt. This photo was taken on 2017-06-07, two days before the World Cup qualification game Latvia vs Portugal two days later. The result of the match was no surprise, Portugal won by 3-0, Ronaldo made two goals.

But since we are in Latvia now, we should remember that the three Baltic states (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania) are celebrating their 100 years of the first independent from Russia, which happened at the end of World War I, in 1917-1918, just like Finland, see my post of 2017-12-06. If you became interested in knowing more about the Baltic states, see reference # 4 below. Reference # 5 is an interesting article from the Finnish Broadcasting Co. (in Swedish) about the activities there during this year of celebration.

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: 1958 FIFA World Cup

2: Kurt Hamrin scores 3-1 against Germany on June 24, 1958

3: Latvia-Portugal on 2017-06-09

4: Baltic states

5: Baltikum minns hundra år av självständighet

*: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-06-12 (Dias dos namorados)

Idag lärde jag mig, att:

I Brasilien firar vi idag ‘Dia dos namorados’, i översättning ungefär ”älsklingarnas dag’, alltså den brasilianska varianten av Alla hjärtans dag. I USA och Sverige firas ju denna kommersiella dag den 14 februari, men när affärsmannen João Doria i slutet av 1940-talet föreslog att den skulle införas också i Brasilien, så valde han den 12 juni. Orsaken till det var att imorgon den 13 juni är det Sankt Antonios dag, som är är känd som bröllopsparens skyddshelgon. Kommersen är likadan som i andra länder med hjärtan i olika storlekar, chokladaskar mm. I referenserna nummer 1 och 2 nedan kan du läsa mer om Dia dos namorados (på portugisiska) och Alla hjärtans dag (på svenska) och deras historia.

Apropå det så tänkte jag på några svenska ord i sammanhanget. De äldre uttrycken käraste och käresta är intressanta eftersom de inte bara byter ut den normala sista vokalen e (för män) och a (för kvinnor), utan använder också motsatt vokal i mitten på ordet. Men dessutom kan ju en tjej kalla sin favoritkille för det dubbla min käraste käraste, medan det motsatta bara blir min käraste käresta. På det fältet är kvinnorna före männen!

Fjäril

Den vackra brandgula fjärilen gömmer sig i busken bland dess röda blommor, foto taget 2018-06-07

Och dagen till ära är ovanstående bilds ledfigur en fjäril, i buskens högerkant. Om någon kan tala om för mig dess namn blir jag mycket tacksam.

Jag avslutar dagens inlägg med fyra bilder från Brasilien, två dagar innan fotbolls-VM 2018 inleds:

Copa18

Även om intresset i allmänhet inte är lika stort som det var vid tidigare fotbollsvärldsmästerskap så försöker affärerna att övertyga konsumenterna med olika kampanjer. Den store stjärnan Neymar Jr (längst till vänster) gör reklam för kaffe och erbjuder de olika tröjor han har använt i sin karriär medan ett varuhus tycker att brasilianarna ska glömma den förödmjukande förlusten mot Tyskland med 7-1 i hemma-VM 2014 och se på VM 2018 med en ny TV-apparat (längst till höger) som inte visat de bilderna. De båda mittbilderna visar intresset att byta bilder på sina idoler, genom användning av både trottoaren framför och utrymmet inne på apoteket. Foton tagna i månadsskiftet april-maj 2018.

(This post is entirely in Swedish, dealing with mainly the Brazilian variant of Valentine’s day, commemorated on June 12.  Also some pictures showing how Brazil is preparing for the World Cup 2018 in football, held in Russia.)

Tack för idag, slut för idag!

Refs.:

1: Dia dos namorados

2: Alla hjärtans dag

+: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-06-06 (Nationaldagen)

Idag lärde jag mig, att:

Sverige firar sin nationaldag idag och det officiella firandet kulminerar ikväll på Skansen med konsert och högtidstal, i närvaro av kungaparet. Orsaken till just denna dag är att 1893 påbörjades firandet av Svenska Flaggans Dag på just Skansen. Skansens grundare, Artur Hazelius, ville instifta en högtidsdag som skulle samla nationen och valde den 6 juni. Det var den dagen, år 1523, som Gustav Vasa utropades till kung och det var den 6 juni 1809 som den då gällande regeringsformen undertecknades. År 1983 döptes sedan denna dag om till Sveriges Nationaldag och den är en offentlig helgdag sedan 2005. Mer om detta kan du läsa om i referenser nummer 1 och 2 nedan.

Vaktparad1

Vaktparad2

Dagen till ära deltog HKH Carl Philip i nationaldagens vaktombyte på Kungliga Slottet, tillsammans med dignitärer från alla vapenslagen. Foto taget av Medieborgarens flygande reporter.

Men det är naturligtvis inte bara i huvudstaden som nationaldagen firas, utan det sker också runt om i vårt avlånga land, allt som oftast kombinerat med att officiellt välkomna nyblivna svenska medborgare. Ett sådant ställe är järnvägsknuten Herrljunga i hjärtan av Västergötland, min hemort. Och där finns en livaktig hembygdsförening med ett intressant friluftsmuseum på Haraberget, ett slags Skansen i miniatyr. Just Herrljunga Hembygdsförening har utsetts till Årets Hembygdsförening av både Västergötlands och Sveriges Hembygdsförbund. STORT GRATTIS!

Haraberget

Dagens bild från Haraberget är därför den mest lämpade, nämligen det första stationshuset i Herrljunga från 1862, när Västra Stambanan invigdes. Se också referens nummer 3 nedan.

Imorgon på dagen 524 år sedan, 1494-06-07, slöts ett av världshistoriens viktigaste fördrag i den spanska staden Tordesillas, i vilket avtalades hur dåtidens stormakter, Portugal och Spanien, skulle fördela de utomeuropeiska landvinningarna mellan sig. Detta fördrag förklarar varför hela västra Sydamerika fortfarande använder spanska som modersmål och östra Sydamerika, dvs. Brasilien, talar portugisiska. Läs mer om fördraget i referens nummer 4 nedan.

Tordesillas

Världskarta som visar uppdelning av utomeuropeiska territorier mellan Portugal och Spanien. Av Lencer – Eget arbete, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=3194339

(Today’s post is entirely in Swedish, in commemoration of the Swedish National Day, celebrated both in the capital and other municipalities around the country. And tomorrow marks the day 524 years ago when the Treaty of Tordesillas was signed by Portugal and Spain.)

Tack för idag, slut för idag!

Refs.:

1: Nationaldagsfirandet på Skansen

2: Sveriges nationaldag

3: Herrljungas äldsta stationshus

4: Tordesillasfördraget

+: What did you learn in school today ?

2018-05-24 (Thursday)

Today, I learned that:

Last Sunday, the Swedish male icehockey team won the World Championships again. You may remember from my post of 2017-05-21 how they won it last year as well. And also this year, the title was won after the final penalty shoot out. But this year, their campaign in the whole tournament was almost impeccable, all games won and only one point lost. The final was held in Copenhagen, Denmark, almost a home game then.

So what could be better than to publish a photo of how the team was received on 2018-05-21 at the park Kungsträdgården in central Stockholm. My Brazilian friend who lives there was also enjoying himself in the sunshine and sent me some nice photos and video clips, muito obrigado! This photo shows the moment when John Klingberg raises the trophy to the enthusiastic crowd’s cheers.

Kungsan

In April, I invested quite some time to accompany all the details of the world championship in curling for male teams, which happened in Las Vegas, NV, USA, as I already anticipated in my post of 2018-03-24. Have a look at the photos below. Besides the different feeding habits of the Swedish and Japanese teams during the mid-game intermission, it is also interesting to note that although the competition is hosted by one of the densest neon and electronic cities in the world, the scoreboards are still manual, mechanical ones with the scores being recorded by magnetic tabs. (In the women’s tournament in March, all scoreboards were electronic.)

LV2018

Three photos taken during the round robin game between Sweden and Japan on 2018-04-06. It is interesting to note how the Japanese cannot forget their habit of bringing the traditional obento, i.e. a lunch box full with culinary delicacies. All photos are screenshoots from the video coverage supplied by the World Curling Federation. See also reference #1 below.

That’s what I learned in school !

Refs.:

1: Japan v Sweden – Round-robin – 361º World Men’s Curling Championship 2018

*: What did you learn in school today ?